Unlike Godzilla, Pacific Rim doesn’t try to be serious even when it’s being serious. Characters have names like Stacker Pentecost and Hercules Hansen. The film requires you to believe that the best way to battle a giant monster is to build an even larger robot to fight that monster.

Much of the Act 2 drama derives from inter-pilot tension airlifted from the Val Kilmer scenes in Top Gun. It’s the polar opposite of the Godzilla school of drama, where everyone is a total professional who has absolutely no personal goal besides Saving The World. In Pacific Rim, Idris Elba is Rinko Kikuchi’s Obi-Wan Kenobi, and two of the last Giant Robot-pilots in the world frequently get into sneering fights over who’s the bigger badass, and Charlie Day is a scientist.

So, for all these reasons, Pacific Rim is a movie that I’ve heard perfectly smart people describe as “stupid” or “silly.” The problem with this line of thinking is that, really, that every blockbuster is pretty “silly,” in the context of Things Adults Should Care About. Godzilla is not less stupid than Pacific Rim just because people frown more. […]

The difference, I think, is that Pacific Rim glories in its own silliness. There’s a flashback scene where Idris Elba rescues a little girl, and when he emerges from his giant robot, the sun shines upon him like he’s the catharsis in a biblical epic. There’s a moment when one giant robot swings an oil tanker like a sword. Then it grows a sword out of its wrist. Then it falls from space to earth.

There are real complaints to make about Pacific Rim, I guess, all of them fair and most of them pedantic. I know a lot of people who have issues with the story. (“Why didn’t they use the wrist-sword earlier?” is a popular one.) Conversely, I don’t really know anyone who minds the story in Godzilla, possibly because everything stupid that happens is prefaced by Frowning Watanabe saying “This is why the stupid thing that’s about to happen makes sense.” Godzilla wants so badly to make sense. Pacific Rim wants so badly for Ron Perlman to wear golden shoes.

- Darren Franich, “Entertainment Geekly: A call for an end to serious blockbusters” (via rahleighs)

(via meetcute-s)

permalink - posted 4 hours ago with 24,649 notes
You know what would make this vase better? Painting pictures of orgies on it that’s what.

- the Ancient Greeks, probably (via witchyroryy)

(via queersirius)

permalink - posted 6 hours ago with 28,113 notes

(via flipyourshit)

permalink - posted 9 hours ago with 542,886 notes

mymodernmet:

Photographer Diggie Vitt's brilliant eye for composition and compellingly eerie narratives are at the heart of his beautifully surreal images.

(via llanval)

permalink - posted 12 hours ago with 38,866 notes

supersoldiers:

toothless + babies

(via queersirius)

permalink - posted 14 hours ago with 5,761 notes

gwythara:

when your obsessive special interest suddenly changes and your blog followers are like wtf this isn’t what i signed up for

(via shadowstiles)

permalink - posted 19 hours ago with 131,108 notes
roseriku:

brocreate:

glassmenagerie:

henryclervall:

OH MY GOD

But have you been on CarpetsForAirports.com?



Omfg

roseriku:

brocreate:

glassmenagerie:

henryclervall:

OH MY GOD

But have you been on CarpetsForAirports.com?

image

Omfg

(via flipyourshit)

permalink - posted 22 hours ago with 33,057 notes

(via kuma-la-la)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 280,044 notes

rpattzhateshislife:

unintentionally-jesus:

yes. it is official. everyone in twilight hates twilight.

It’s not just Rob

(via flipyourshit)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 97,950 notes

shrineart:

quietzombiegirl:

everyone’s grandparents seem to have really cute stories of how they met, and like my grandparents met when my grandma was running away from police during a protest and she jumped on the back of my grandads motorcycle and just screamed “DRIVE FUCKING DRIVE”

I dunno man I think that story’s pretty fuckin cute.

(via snarkasaurus)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 234,923 notes

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

(via snarkasaurus)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 10,103 notes

drawingforawesome:

aaliens:

Excuse me I could live in there

I’ve been interested in these houses for 2 years now. I’m determined to live in one one day.

(via styliferous)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 277,933 notes
But many male creators (and fans) are saying now that the whole debate is derailing real conversations about rape and women in comics without recognizing that women who read comics, many if them assault survivors, are the ones raising the protest. It’s easier to think that this isn’t really part of the problem, that the real misogynists (much like the real racists) are over there somewhere, that THEY aren’t the problem. Someone else is. But by dismissing women who object, by telling them that this isn’t the right objection to have…that is the CORE of the problem.

- croguesberg in the comments for When Having Opinions Brings Rape Threats: A Captain America Story

(via seizure7)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 480 notes
iamagreenturtle:

mrprincesshorse:

therainbowgorilla:

alexianfireflies:

therainbowgorilla:

nextstepcake:

"Ace Hardware: No screwing, just lots of screws."
"Ace Hardware: Nail your roof, not your partner."
"Ace Hardware: For when it really is just a hammer in your pocket"
One of my friends wanted to see a photomanip of the ace hardware logo in ace flag colors, and then I thought of these terrible puns, so here you go.

At first I wasn’t going to reblog this but then I saw it again and just started laughing
my two favorite things: asexuality, and puns

and those puns are literally the best

I NEED more asexual puns
those are indeed the best

"Ace Hardware: Lube for your motor, not your junk"

"Ace Hardware: Erecting buildings, not your penis."
"Ace Hardware: Where nuts aren’t genitalia."
"Ace Hardware: The hammer is not our penis; it’s just a hammer."
"Ace Hardware: Where muff is short for muffler."
"Ace Hardware: Yes that is a hammer, but we’re still happy to see you."
"Ace Hardware: You can get Off™ in our repellent aisle.”

iamagreenturtle:

mrprincesshorse:

therainbowgorilla:

alexianfireflies:

therainbowgorilla:

nextstepcake:

"Ace Hardware: No screwing, just lots of screws."

"Ace Hardware: Nail your roof, not your partner."

"Ace Hardware: For when it really is just a hammer in your pocket"

One of my friends wanted to see a photomanip of the ace hardware logo in ace flag colors, and then I thought of these terrible puns, so here you go.

At first I wasn’t going to reblog this but then I saw it again and just started laughing

my two favorite things: asexuality, and puns

and those puns are literally the best

I NEED more asexual puns

those are indeed the best

"Ace Hardware: Lube for your motor, not your junk"

"Ace Hardware: Erecting buildings, not your penis."

"Ace Hardware: Where nuts aren’t genitalia."

"Ace Hardware: The hammer is not our penis; it’s just a hammer."

"Ace Hardware: Where muff is short for muffler."

"Ace Hardware: Yes that is a hammer, but we’re still happy to see you."

"Ace Hardware: You can get Off in our repellent aisle.

(via snarkasaurus)

permalink - posted 1 day ago with 18,896 notes